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How to find the perfect match for your fish


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How to pair up Banggai Cardinalfish

(Photos belong to www.Advanced Aquarist.com)

Juvenile cardinalfish are difficult to sex due to their size. The physical characteristics of the adults are visible when they are well fed. Males have two vents that will extend away from the body (as shown in the photo) and females have only one.

Female Banggai cardinalfish (one vent):

Male Banggai cardinalfish (two vents):

         

How to pair up Dwarf Angelfish:

Juvenile Centropyge angels begin life as female and turn into males. If you are getting a mature fish then pair it with the smallest juvenile you can. One male can be kept with one or two females.  

(Flame Angelfish pair, photo belongs to www.reef2reef.com)

Determining the sex of the members of Genicanthus genus is much easier as they show sexual dimorphism (different coloration or pattern between males and females). They also can be kept in pairs or harems.

(Bellus Angelfish Pair, photo belongs to www.reefwise.com)

How to pair up Anthias:

Anthias are best to be kept in groups of which the largest and strongest individual will turn into a male.

(Squareback anthias group, Photo belongs to www.liveaquaria.com)

How to pair up Clownfish:

Juvenile clownfish begin life as male and turn into females. If you are getting a mature fish then pair it with the smallest juvenile you can. One male can be kept with one female.

(Maroon clownfish pair, Photo belongs to www.animal-world.com)

How to pair up Tangs:

There is no easy way to tell the difference between male and female. In a small system it’s best to keep only one individual to avoid aggression, however, in large systems a group of individuals can be housed together and may show spawning behavior.

(Group of yellow tangs in the wild. Photo belongs to www.hakaimagazine.com)

How to pair up Dragonets (Mandarins, Ruby Reds, Scooter Dragonets):

Males have a long dorsal spine which makes it easy to determine sex. They are best to be kept in pairs.

(Photos belong to www.aquacorals.com and www.reefbuilders.com)

Female Dragonet:

 

Male Dragonet:

How to pair up Wrasses:

Wrasses show sexual dimorphism, males are larger and more colorful than females. They’re best to be kept in pairs.

(Flame wrasse pair, photo belongs to www.reef2reef.com)

How to pair up Basslets:

They all are born females but can change sex to males as they mature.

They are best to be kept in pairs or harems (one large male and 2-3 smaller females).

(Royal Gramma pair, photo belongs to www.marinebreeder.org )

 

Now that you know how to find the perfect match for your fish, it’s time to find the perfect match for you.

Don’t miss out on our Love is in the Air Pair Sales For Your Valentine – going on all next week! 

…or surprise your loved one with a gift card so they can pick their perfect pair for their tank. 

We’ll see you next week! ❤️

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